I’ve posted about my experience with Bookbub in the past, but wanted to do it again with 3 different sets of data.

  1. My ebook collection (5 novels and 1 novella) for $2.99.
  2. The first book in my Fantasy series priced at $0.99.
  3. The first book in my ChickLit series priced at free.

*pushes up sleeves*

Prep yo’self. This is a long one.

The Details of my BookBub Results

From the Network Series Complete Collection

Date: November 13—17th 2016

Original Price: $9.99

Deal Price: $2.99

Retailers: Amazon, Nook, iTunes, Kobo, etc. (Wide distribution).

Cost for the ad: $575

Email list: Teen and Young Adult

Countries: US and international

To be honest, I didn’t know what to expect. The $2.99 price point (even though $7.00 less than originally priced) made me nervous. Bookbubbers love a deal. Compared to free and $0.99, $2.99 just isn’t as appealing.

Also, the power of BookBub in the past has been the “long tail.” IE—people buying the first book from the ad and then slowly buying up the rest of the series.

The Results

My BookBub Results from 2016 KCrossWriting BookBub Results 1

 

This graph shows total sales for the month of the ad. The weird thing? Almost all these sales happened the day of and the day after the ad. In other words: zero long tail whatsoever. Two days after the ad went live, sales went right back to normal.

Literally.

I call this small-moderate success. Spike in sales. A little extra cash. No changes in my email list I can accurately track back. No long tail and no change in sales afterwards. Many variables could play into the results: I don’t think Teen and YA was the right list. Next time, I’ll attempt Fantasy. And the $2.99 price point, while amazing, I think was too much to entice people.

#ridiculous

Let’s look at a vastly different Bookbub ad with the beginning novel in the series.

The Details

Miss Mabel’s School for Girls

Date: February 12—16th 2016

Original Price: $2.99

Deal Price: $0.99

Retailers: Amazon, Nook, iTunes, Kobo, etc. (Wide distribution).

Cost for the ad: $520

Email list: Fantasy

Countries: US and international

I had high expectations going into this Bookbub. I prepared by changing the back matter to reflect my email list right after the book ended (complete with enticing lead magnet of a free copy of the second book in the series). I even worked directly with Mark from Kobo Writing Life and generated a free Kobo coupon code (as well as uploaded a Kobo-only version) for AA as another means for tracking. I had well over 150 reviews, a sticker from an award on the front, and a killer book cover.

The Results

 

My BookBub Results from 2016 KCrossWriting BookBub Results 2

This Bookbub had a definitive long tail that extended well into June with higher sales (and royalties). Perhaps greatest of all was the change in email list subscribers—which I attribute to the right back matter, and a great lead magnet.

February: + 299

March: + 138

April: + 160

I felt that the $0.99 price point and the Fantasy mailing list all contributed to this successful Bookbub campaign.

Now let’s check out a free campaign.

The Details

Bon Bons to Yoga Pants

Date: April 19—26th, 2016

Original Price: $2.99

Deal Price: Free

Retailers: Amazon, Nook, iTunes, Kobo, etc. (Wide distribution).

Cost for the ad: $105

Email list: Chick Lit

Countries: US and international

This was my first time doing a free promotion through Bookbub, and for so little money (in comparison to the other two ads) I was mostly curious to see what numbers I’d pull. My main goal was to pull in reviews and email subscribers to prepare for the launch of the second book. I just wanted exposure. As I had no second book available, I didn’t expect a long tail. But I did have an award sticker for this book as well, so I hoped that would help.

The Results

 

My BookBub Results from 2016 KCrossWriting BookBub Results 3

A few things stuck out to me from this campaign:

I had little-to-no-success with retailers outside Amazon with a free book. Super strange. HOWEVER . . . sales doubled from normal (sometimes tripled) on that book with those retailers in May.

By far, the free ad was the most successful ad across the other countries in Amazon. The other two only pulled in a few sales from places like Brazil, Canada, Australia, etc. The free campaign pulled in downloads in every other country.

My email subscribers increased, but nothing mind-blowing. (Although I love ALL of you <3)

April: + 83

May: + 14

June: + 17

I don’t read reviews on places like Amazon or Goodreads, but I checked back on the numbers and remember an increase in reviews by at least 75 a few weeks after the campaign.

I called this a moderate success because I pulled in reviews and more email subscribers to help prepare for the launch of the second book. (Which I still haven’t released. Sigh.) But I don’t feel that a free campaign really impressed me the way my $0.99 did.

In Conclusion

In my humble opinion (and after 6 Bookbub ads—not all have been included here) I think the key things to get right are:

  1. Back matter
  2. Category (Get the right email list on Bookbub)
  3. $0.99 price point

Other helpful things I’ve noticed:

  • Having an award sticker on the cover
  • Having several books available in a series after the featured book
  • Having more than 50-75 reviews, if possible

Every Bookbub ad I’ve ever had has surprised me in some way. My results may pale in comparison to other indies. Or maybe they’re awesome. *shrugs* Dunno. But I hope this breakdown is helpful.

Bottom line: Bookbub has given me a lot of exposure, higher rankings in categories (which leads to more sales and a better long tail), and royalties that help me push out more books. They’ve always been worth the money, and always earn the price back. (Even on the free book, which had increased sales across all platforms the next month.)

Totally. Worth. It.

Have you had a Bookbub ad? What would you have done differently?

80 Shares
Share55
Tweet
Pin9
Share
+1
Stumble